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Electric Vehicle Update

March 18, 2014

BEV, PHEV and plain HEV sales, in 2013, are shown here.

US Sales of Electric Vehicles, Including HEVs

 
Month

Hybrid (HEVs)

PHEVs & Extended Range Vehicles

Battery (BEVs)

Totals

January

34,611

2,354

2,022

38,987

February

40,173

2,789

2,616

45,578

March

46,327

3,079

4,553

53,959

April

42,804

2,735

4,403

49,942

May

48,796

3,209

4,545

56,550

June

44,924

4,169

4,573

53,666

July

45,494

3,499

3,943

52,936

August

53,020

6,407

4,956

64,383

September

33,576

4,477

3,650

41,703

October

33,565

6,367

3,733

43,625

November

36,085

4,903

3,930

44,918

December

36,155

5,020

4,770

49,945

Totals

495,530

49,008

47,694

592,232

Combined sales for PHEVs and BEVs in 2013, were 96,702 vehicles.

This compares with 2012 vehicle sales of 38,584 for PHEVs and 14,251for BEVs, or a total of 52,835 vehicles.

Therefore, in 2013: PHEV sales increased by 27%, while BEV sales increased a very respectable 235%.

It should be noted that Tesla accounted for approximately 18,000 of the 47,694 BEV sales in 2013.

Volt and Leaf pictures from DOE

Volt and Leaf pictures from DOE

While this growth would seem to reflect a positive scenario, the total number of PHEV and BEV vehicles is trivial, compared with the sale of all other vehicles, as well as the original projections of 1 million vehicles.

For reference, sales in 2011, essentially the first year for PHEV and BEV sales, were 7,671 PHEVs and 10,064 BEVs.

For the period 2011 thru 2013, PHEV sales were 95,263 vehicles, while BEV sales were 72,009 vehicles.

Total PHEV and BEV sales combined; for 2011 thru 2013, were only 167,272 vehicles.

This compares with Obama’s 2011 call for 1,000,000 EVs on the road by 2015. It’s also a very paltry payback for the $5 billion the government has spent pushing electric vehicles.

This brings us to an important distinction between HEVs, i.e., hybrids, and plug-in vehicles, because some news media and environmental groups are trying to restate Obama’s goal by including HEVs. With HEVs, total sales already exceed 1,000,000 vehicles.

An important distinction between HEVs and plug-in vehicles is that only Plug-in vehicles can travel extended distances on battery power. For example, HEVs can only travel around 2 miles on battery power.

Another distinction is that HEVs don’t use grid power.

Only PHEVs and BEVs use grid power to recharge their batteries.

Trying to include HEVs merely distorts whether PHEVs and BEVs are having a significant impact on pollution and CO2 emissions.

It also distorts the reality of paltry PHEV and BEV sales.

*  *  *  *  *  *

 

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. March 25, 2014 11:22 am

    Donn,

    Not sure if you saw this real world evaluation of a few EV’s.

    “…The AAA tests revealed that while the average battery range for all three EVs was 105 miles at 75 degrees Fahrenheit, this dropped to 43 miles when the outside temperature was 20 degrees. AAA found that a warmer temperature has less effect on battery range, but still lowered it to an average of 69 miles on a full charge at 95 degrees Fahrenheit.”…

    http://editorial.autos.msn.com/blogs/post–aaa-ev-battery-range-but-by-more-than-half-in-cold-weather

    I wonder if First Solar’s energy storage applications have similar degradation with temperature. If yes, it certainly makes the ROI calculations a bit more difficult to figure out. Using EV’s batteries to supplement the grid if you have to heat or cool the environment the batteries are stored doesn’t sound like a very CO2 or cost effective activity.

    PS Great story on the Berlin airlift!

    • March 25, 2014 11:57 am

      Thanks for the information. No, I had not seen it, but it’s very revealing.
      Also, thanks for your comment on the Berlin Airlift story. It’s a powerful event and a powerful story about the pilots who flew the missions.

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